School teaches

That expertise is out there and that it is narrowly defined.

That we should narrow our focus and specialize.

That if you, the student, don’t know the answer, that there’s an expert who knows better than you.

It’s a sharpen-your-number-2-pencils mindset.  It’s lessons from last centuries’ economy.  And I worry that as we try to improve education we’re focused on bringing as many people as possible up last centuries’ standard when what we need is 21st century aspirations.

It’s easy for me as a parent to find which schools are most likely to produce high SAT scores and good college admissions – easy to find schools that do a good job of teaching kids to do well on tests and get into other schools.

What if you want to find the schools that are best at fostering creativity, curiosity, and right-brain thinking?  Where do you even begin to look?

Closing thoughts from renowned photographer Platon from fear.less:

I came to realize that it’s actually irrelevant how anybody else does it if you’re looking for a formula to apply to yourself. The truth is, everyone’s journey is different, everyone’s personality is different, and everyone’s talent or weaknesses are different.

Amen.

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2 Responses to School teaches

  1. KimMarie Saccoccio says:

    What if you want to find the schools that are best at fostering creativity, curiosity, and right-brain thinking? Where do you even begin to look?

    I encourage all parents to look at Montessori schools if they want their children to learn how to think outside the box. My children attended a Montessori program that they attended through Middle School that taught them leadership, creativity, independent thinking and their responsibility to a community. What more could I ask for in a school?

  2. Pingback: From the Blogroll XXX: Next to Abnormal? | The Clyde Fitch Report

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